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ERIC Number: EJ824282
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2003-Jun
Pages: 9
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0016-9013
Differences between Older Men and Women in the Self-Rated Health-Mortality Relationship
Bath, Peter A.
Gerontologist, v43 n3 p387-395 Jun 2003
Purpose: The aims of this study were to examine differences between older men and women: (a) in the ability of self-rated health to predict mortality, (b) in the effect of different follow-up periods on the self-rated health mortality relationship, and (c) in the relative importance of self-rated health and self-rated change in health in predicting mortality. Design and Methods: By using data from the Nottingham Longitudinal Study of Activity and Ageing, the author assessed relationships between self-rated health and self-rated change in health and 4- and 12-year mortality in separate unadjusted and adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models in men and women. Results: The differences between men and women in the hazard ratios for poor self-rated health were not significant, although there were differences in the explanatory factors. The relationship between self-rated health and short-term and long-term mortality was explained by age and health among men. The relationship between self-rated health and short-term mortality was explained by age, physical and mental health, and physical activity among women. The relationship between self-rated health and long-term mortality was explained by age, physical health, and physical activity among women. The relationship between self-rated change in health and short-term mortality was explained by age among men and women. The relationship between self-rated change in health and long-term mortality was explained by age and physical health among men and women. Social engagement was an independent predictor of short- and long-term mortality among men and women in this study. Implications: The finding that low self-rated health was not an independent predictor of mortality among men or women, contrary to many, but not all, previous studies, may be related to differences in study design and/or across cultures. Further research investigating relationships between self-rated health and mortality and potential explanatory variables should analyze men and women separately and should consider the length of follow-up period. The benefits of individual physical and social activities in reducing mortality merit further investigation.
Gerontological Society of America. 1030 15th Street NW Suite 250, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 202-842-1275; Fax: 202-842-1150; e-mail: geron@geron.org; Web site: http://www.geron.org/journals/gsapub.htm
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A