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ERIC Number: EJ817242
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2004
Pages: 14
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 66
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0165-0254
Parenting Behaviours during Child Problem Solving: The Roles of Child Temperament, Mother Education and Personality, and the Problem-Solving Context
Neitzel, Carin; Stright, Anne Dopkins
International Journal of Behavioral Development, v28 n2 p166-179 2004
Child temperament, parent openness to experience, conscientiousness, and education, and parent a priori assessments of the task were examined in relation to parenting behaviours during child problem solving. Mothers and their children (73 dyads) were visited the summer before kindergarten. Mothers' cognitive, emotional, and autonomy support were coded as they provided assistance during four child problem-solving tasks. Mothers with more education provided more metacognitive information. Before education was considered, it appeared that mothers who perceived their children as difficult and who were less open to experiences were less likely to regulate task difficulty, encourage their children's efforts, and encourage their children's active role in problem solving. However, more educated mothers regulated task difficulty, encouraged their children's efforts, and encouraged their children's active role more when they perceived their children as difficult than when they perceived their children as easy. More educated mothers also were likely to regulate task difficulty and encourage their children's active role regardless of their openness. Children perceived as difficult were most likely to be rejected and also were particularly likely to be rejected if the mother was highly conscientious. Conscientious mothers were likely to be overly controlling. When mothers perceived the task negatively they were less likely to provide metacognitive information, regulate task difficulty, and encourage the child's active role; and were more likely to be overcontrolling and rejecting. (Contains 6 tables and 4 figures.)
SAGE Publications. 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320. Tel: 800-818-7243; Tel: 805-499-9774; Fax: 800-583-2665; e-mail: journals@sagepub.com; Web site: http://sagepub.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Parents
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: NEO Five Factor Inventory