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ERIC Number: EJ816387
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Oct
Pages: 17
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1382-4996
Problem-Based Learning at the Receiving End: A "Mixed Methods" Study of Junior Medical Students' Perspectives
Maudsley, Gillian; Williams, Evelyn M. I.; Taylor, David C. M.
Advances in Health Sciences Education, v13 n4 p435-451 Oct 2008
Qualitative insights about students' personal experience of inconsistencies in implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) might help refocus expert discourse about good practice. Aim: This study explored how junior medical students conceptualize: PBL; good tutoring; and less effective sessions. Methods: Participants comprised junior medical students in Liverpool 5-year problem-based, community-orientated curriculum. Data collection and analysis were mostly cross-sectional, using inductive analysis of qualitative data from four brief questionnaires and a "mixed" qualitative/quantitative approach to data handling. The 1999 cohort (end-Year 1) explored PBL, generated "good tutor" themes, and identified PBL (dis)advantages (end-Year 1 then mid-Year 3). The 2001 cohort (start-Year 1) described critical incidents, and subsequently (end-Year 1) factors in less effective sessions. These factors were coded using coding-frames generated from the answers about critical incidents and "good tutoring". Results: Overall, 61.2% (137), 77.9% (159), 71.0% (201), and 71.0% (198) responded to the four surveys, respectively. Responders perceived PBL as essentially process-orientated, focused on small-groupwork/dynamics and testing understanding through discussion. They described "good tutors" as knowing when and how to intervene without dominating (51.1%). In longitudinal data (end-Year 1 to mid-Year 3), the main perceived disadvantage remained lack of "syllabus" (and related uncertainty). For less effective sessions (end-Year 1), tutor transgressions reflected unfulfilled expectations of good tutors, mostly intervening poorly (42.6% of responders). Student transgressions reflected the critical incident themes, mostly students' own lack of work/preparation (54.8%) and other students participating poorly (33.7%) or dominating/being self-centred (31.6%). Conclusion: Compelling individual accounts of uncomfortable PBL experiences should inform improvements in implementation.
Springer. 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013. Tel: 800-777-4643; Tel: 212-460-1500; Fax: 212-348-4505; e-mail: service-ny@springer.com; Web site: http://www.springerlink.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: Students
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United Kingdom (Liverpool)