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ERIC Number: EJ812627
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2007-Oct
Pages: 18
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1387-1579
The Online Learning Environment--A New Model Using Social Constructivism and the Concept of "Ba" as a Theoretical Framework
Bryceson, Kim
Learning Environments Research, v10 n3 p189-206 Oct 2007
Organisations that provide education are businesses and, as such, are not immune from the impact that the Internet has had in recent years, both on the way organisations conduct their business "and" as a business supporting technology. Indeed, the use of the Internet as a facilitating mechanism for educational course delivery has been growing steadily over the last 5-8 years and, although there are some significant issues that have arisen in that time in relation to the quality of learning that can be achieved, there is no doubt that it will continue to be developed as an educational tool. The real issue for educators is, therefore, not "whether" the Internet will be used in course delivery, or "if" it is a useful tool, but rather "how" can a teacher make best use of it to enhance learning? This article documents a study that has analysed five years of student reflections on the scaffolding mechanisms used to promote and encourage learning in five Internet-based courses at the University of Queensland run between 2001 and 2005. The courses involved include three Internet-delivered Masters coursework courses and two Internet-delivered undergraduate courses in three different discipline areas. The outcomes of the study are: (1) a Report Card documenting student evaluations of the scaffolding mechanisms used; (2) a What, Why, How, Where framework of scaffolding mechanisms that are best suited to enabling deep learning through the online environment, and (3) a proposed new model of knowledge acquisition in online learning environments entitled ESCIE, which is based on Nonaka's SECI and Ba models of knowledge creation.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A