NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ811599
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Aug
Pages: 35
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0018-2680
Beyond Civics and the 3 R's: Teaching Economics in the Schools
Yarrow, Andrew L.
History of Education Quarterly, v48 n3 p397-431 Aug 2008
During the twenty to twenty-five years after World War II, children in the United States were increasingly taught to understand their nation, its history, and its economic greatness--as an "economy"--rather than in social, moral, philosophical, or political terms. During this time period, not only did an economics education movement emerge, but economics increasingly was taught as part of social studies, history, or other classes, and a huge amount of curricular material was developed and disseminated for classroom use. It is all but impossible to reconstruct what actually occurred in hundreds of thousands of classrooms with millions of teachers and tens of millions of students--although efforts to do so undoubtedly would prove fascinating. Textbooks and other curricular materials, including filmstrips and student-oriented "Scholastic" magazines, provide a proxy, albeit imperfect, for what children were learning about the United States. In this article, the author examines how economics has been taught to American school children from 1900s to the present. (Contains 91 footnotes and 5 figures.)
Blackwell Publishing. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8599; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: customerservices@blackwellpublishing.com; Web site: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/jnl_default.asp
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; High Schools; Intermediate Grades; Junior High Schools; Middle Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States