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ERIC Number: EJ807139
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Sep
Pages: 19
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 66
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0007-1013
"Intentional Repetition" and Learning Style: Increasing Efficient and Cohesive Interaction in Asynchronous Online Discussions
Topcu, Abdullah
British Journal of Educational Technology, v39 n5 p901-919 Sep 2008
This study verified the efficacy of the intentional repetition technique in improving interaction in asynchronous online discussions by taking into account the learning styles of the participants. A conceptual framework served for the development of the technique, which conceptualises efficient and cohesive interaction on a continuum of process that move from social presence to production of an artefact. Sixty-one university students participated in the study. A quasi-experimental research design was used. The subjects, who were assigned randomly into two groups, were tested using Kolb's learning style inventory. The results showed that the experimental group exposed to the intentional repetition technique produced significantly better interaction than the control group, regardless of their learning styles, which had no significant effect on the interaction. Moreover, there was no interaction effect between the learning styles and the treatment. The implications arising from these results identify various suggestions for increasing the coherence and depth of the interaction amongst students in asynchronous online discussions.
Blackwell Publishing. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8599; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: customerservices@blackwellpublishing.com; Web site: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/jnl_default.asp
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Learning Style Inventory