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ERIC Number: EJ797328
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Jun
Pages: 4
Abstractor: Author
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1072-0502
Reactivation-Dependent Amnesia for Appetitive Memories Is Determined by the Contingency of Stimulus Presentation
Lee, Jonathan L. C.; Everitt, Barry J.
Learning & Memory, v15 n6 p390-393 Jun 2008
Previously acquired aversive and appetitive memories are not stable and permanent. The reactivation of such memories by re-exposure to training stimuli renders them vulnerable to disruption by amnestic agents such as the noncompetitive N-methyl-"D"-aspartate receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-"SH"-dibenzo{a,d}cyclohepten-5,10imine maleate (MK-801). However, relatively little is known about the parameters that influence the reactivation process. Here, we show that the method of stimulus presentation during memory reactivation is of great importance. Male Lister Hooded rats were trained to acquire a lever press response that delivered a sucrose reward paired with a light conditioned stimulus (CS). The CS-sucrose association was then reactivated through re-exposure to the CS, either contingently upon the lever press response, or noncontingently in the absence of instrumental responding. Systemic administration of MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) at the time of memory reactivation resulted in amnesia, and hence a reduction in subsequent sucrose seeking induced by, and dependent upon, presentation of the CS, only when the memory was reactivated contingently. Therefore, stimuli may have to be presented in the same manner at memory reactivation as during learning in order to render a previously acquired memory vulnerable to disruption. These results have important implications for the potential translational use of glutamatergic treatments in conjunction with targeted memory reactivation.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. 500 Sunnyside Blvd, Woodbury, NY 11797-2924. Tel: 800-843-4388; Tel: 516-367-8800; Fax: 516-422-4097; e-mail: cshpres@cshl.edu; Web site: http://www.learnmem.org/
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A