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ERIC Number: EJ796742
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2007-Nov
Pages: 10
Abstractor: Author
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1871-1871
Do Modes of Thinking Predict Career Interest Types among Chinese University Students?
Zhang, Li-fang; Fan, Weiqiao
Thinking Skills and Creativity, v2 n2 p118-127 Nov 2007
This study had two objectives. The preliminary objective was to further test the psychometric properties of the short-version self-directed search that was intended to be a brief research tool for measuring Holland [Holland, J. L. (1973). "Making vocational choices: A theory of careers." Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; Holland, J. L. (1994). "Self-directed search." Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources] six career interest types. The primary objective, though, was to examine the predictive power of modes of thinking for career interest types. Modes of thinking were grounded in Torrance's [Torrance, E. P. (1981). "Implications of whole-brained theories of learning and thinking for computer-based instruction." "Journal of Computer-Based Instruction," 7(4), 99-105] notion of brain dominance. Two hundred and seventy-two university students from Shanghai, People's Republic of China, responded to the style of learning and thinking and the short-version self-directed search. Results showed that after gender effect was taken into account, the holistic mode of thinking (characterized by its creativity-generating tendency) significantly predicted five of the six career interest types (realistic, investigative, artistic, social, and enterprising) defined by Holland. The analytic mode of thinking (characterized by its tendency for norm-conformity) contributed to Holland's conventional career interest type. We discuss implications of these findings for university educational and career counselors and for faculty members. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: Counselors; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: China (Shanghai)