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ERIC Number: EJ787296
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Feb
Pages: 2
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0036-6439
Futuristics in K-12 Classrooms
Shostak, Arthur B.
School Administrator, v65 n2 p52-53 Feb 2008
Youngsters nowadays have grown up learning "protect tomorrow!" lessons from "Barney" and "Bill Nye the Science Guy." They have been tutored by unforgettable futuristic movies like "A.I." and "E.T," by science fiction serials and "Star Trek" reruns and by future-oriented series on cable TV (including material on The History Channel). Of course, they're also influenced by many over-the-horizon sites on the Internet. Never before have so many had as many communication resources with which to feed their natural curiosity about tomorrow. As helpful as this is in keeping America in the forefront as one of the world's prime innovators (ever more Nobel Prize winners, distinguished inventors, trend-setting products and services, etc.), it brings with it an over-looked hazard of significance. Never before have so many impressionable youngsters had as great a need for help in separating the wheat from the chaff. All forecasts, all visions of tomorrow--as adults know full well--are not of equal value. In this article, the author states that schools can help in three major ways: (1) They can teach youngsters how to distinguish worthy from poor or even dangerous forecasts; (2) they can nurture optimism concerning the future, as this is a vital source of America's "can do!" spirit (the envy of nations everywhere); and (3) they can upgrade their awareness of tomorrow's job market and employer expectations of them, the better to improve their chances of success. Schools have to "futurize" their system--that is make the art of futuristics a comfortable and constructive part of its culture. While there is no one all-purpose blueprint for accomplishing this, here, the author presents seven sequential steps that must be considered.
American Association of School Administrators. 801 North Quincy Street Suite 700, Arlington, VA 22203-1730. Tel: 703-528-0700; Fax: 703-841-1543; e-mail: info@aasa.org; Web site: http://www.aasa.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A