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ERIC Number: EJ779088
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2007-Dec
Pages: 6
Abstractor: Author
Reference Count: 18
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0964-2633
Magnetoencephalographic Analysis of Cortical Activity in Adults with and without Down Syndrome
Virji-Babul, N.; Cheung, T.; Weeks, D.; Herdman, A. T.; Cheyne, D.
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, v51 n12 p982-987 Dec 2007
Background: This preliminary study served as a pilot for an ongoing analysis of spectral power in adults with Down syndrome (DS) using a 151 channel whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG). The present study is the first step for examining and comparing cortical responses during spontaneous and task related activity in DS. Method: Cortical responses were recorded with a 151 channel whole head MEG system in three adults with DS and three age-matched adults without DS. MEG data were obtained at rest with eyes open and during observation of point-light displays of human motion and object motion. Data from both groups were evaluated by spectral analysis. Results: The preliminary results showed greater alpha (8-14 Hz) power particularly in the occipital and parietal areas during the eyes open condition in the adults with DS in relation to a normal comparison group. The visual task had little effect on alpha power in the comparison group. Engaging in the visual task reduced power in alpha across all regions in the DS group to the level observed in comparisons. In the gamma band (30-50 Hz), power values were similar across both groups for the eyes open condition. In the comparison group, large reductions in gamma were observed in the occipital and bilateral temporal areas during the visual task. This change was not observed in the DS group. Conclusions: The results from this pilot study suggest that MEG may be useful in characterizing task-specific changes in cortical activity in individuals with DS. Future studies with a larger group of individuals will further contribute to our understanding of the neurophysiology of Down syndrome.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A