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ERIC Number: EJ763897
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2006
Pages: 8
Abstractor: Author
Reference Count: 36
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-8756-5943
Obesity Status and Body Satisfaction: Are There Differences between African American College Females at Black and White Universities?
James, Delores C. S.; Bonds, Jennifer R.
Health Educator, v38 n1 p7-14 Spr 2006
The goals of this project were to 1) assess obesity status and body satisfaction among African American college students, and 2) to compare differences in these variables between students at a predominantly white university (PWU) and a historically black college and university (HBCU). Four hundred and two undergraduate females completed a self-administered survey (199 HBCU and 203 PWU). The mean BMI for all respondents was 25.24 plus or minus 5.56. There was no significant difference between schools (HBCU = 25.62 plus or minus 6.0; PWU = 24.89 plus or minus 5.10) on BMI. Thirty-seven percent were satisfied/very satisfied with their weight, 36% were somewhat satisfied, and 27% were dissatisfied/very dissatisfied with their weight. There was no significant difference between schools. Fifty-one percent reported weight gain in college. Students at the HBCU who reported weight gain had higher BMI (27.22 plus or minus 0.56) than students at the PWU (25.53 plus or minus 0.52) who reported weight gain (p less than 0.01). Fifty-one percent of respondents said they thought about their weight everyday/almost everyday. There was no significant difference by school (p greater than 0.05). BMI varied by housing status; students living at home or alone off-campus had significantly higher BMI than those living on campus or off-campus with roommates (p = 0.0003). This study found few significant differences in weight status and body satisfaction between African American college females attending a HBCU and a PWU. Differences were due mainly to the demographic characteristics of the samples, particularly housing arrangement. Implications for college wellness programs are discussed. (Contains 3 tables.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Florida