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ERIC Number: EJ746693
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2006
Pages: 4
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0190-2946
Pleasure and Danger in Online Teaching and Learning
Chisholm, Julie K.
Academe, v92 n6 p39-42 Nov-Dec 2006
These days, most newly hired faculty are appointed on a part-or full-time nontenure- track basis. The AAUP has reported that between 1975 and 2003, full-time tenure-track positions increased by only about 16 percent, while full-time non-tenure-track positions grew by 178 percent, and part-time appointment rose by 189 percent. Yet tenure eligibility is not necessarily the most important aspect of the generation gap separating newly hired non-tenure-track faculty and the tenured professors with whom these faculty teach. Teachers' association with pedagogical technology, especially online instruction, divides them to an even greater degree. Contingent faculty and teaching assistants are far more likely to be involved in aggressive distance education initiatives that limit faculty agency and operate on a market model. Even though tenured faculty may participate less often in these initiatives, the way many colleges and universities are introducing new educational technologies threatens the control of all faculty members over their pedagogy. The author argues that it is thus time to bridge the technology gap and work together to take charge of online educational technologies at institutions. In this article, the author suggests strategies on what today's faculty can do to prevent this systematic devaluation of the teaching profession. These strategies include: (1) Tenured faculty members must act to ensure that untenured faculty, adjuncts, and teaching assistants are not exploited by aggressive distance education initiatives that limit faculty agency; (2) Faculty must be informed of their rights; and (3) Faculty must participate in decisions about new educational technologies. (Contains 1 note.)
American Association of University Professors. 1012 Fourteenth Street NW Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 800-424-2973; Tel: 202-737-5900; Fax: 202-737-5526; e-mail: academe@aaup.org; Web site: http://www.aaup.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: Higher Education Act Title IV