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ERIC Number: EJ725580
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2005-Sep-1
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 16
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0146-3934
The Story behind the Catalyst: Channing Club Vs. the Board of Regents of TTU
Duemer, Lee S.; Bankes, Paul; Boss, Jeffrey; Cochran, Amanda; McCrary, Jaci; Salazar, Dora
College Student Journal, v39 n3 p455 Sep 2005
The lawsuit Channing Club vs. The Board of Regents of Texas Tech University, 1970 has been used as a legal precedent in many student press censorship cases. A thorough understanding of Channing has become increasingly important since Hazelwood and other related decisions. Though Channing has been frequently cited in the literature, comparatively little is known about the specifics of the case. This study adds to the body of literature on student affairs by detailing why Texas Tech University (TTU) administrators sought to ban its distribution, and why the court ruling sided with the newspaper. The lawsuit Channing Club vs. The Board of Regents of Texas Tech University, 1970 (hereafter referred to as Channing) has been used as a legal precedent in many student press censorship cases. This study adds to the body of literature on student affairs by detailing why Texas Tech University (TTU) administrators sought to ban its distribution, and why the court ruling sided with the newspaper. This study uses an intrinsic case study method (Stake, 1994), where the case itself is of primary interest (Campbell, 1975). The study of this case helps provide scholars and student personnel administrators with a foundational understanding of student press censorship. Data analysis began with the use of open coding in an issue-related framework (Malinowski, 1984) to identify portions that related to administrative justifications for banning The Catalyst. Data sources consisted of court information briefs and complete court transcripts. The findings from this study follow those of Hohner and Stetar in that administrators perceived The Catalyst as a threat to the maintenance of campus order and control. The Catalyst was viewed as part of a more comprehensive student movement to disrupt university operations and ferment violent disruption.
Project Innovation, Inc., P.O. Box 8508, Spring Hill Station, Mobile, AL 36689-0508. Web site: http://journals825.home.mindspring.com/csj.html.
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Texas