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ERIC Number: EJ1137408
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2017
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 30
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-482X
Physical Education Experiences at Residential Schools for Students Who Are Blind: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Haegele, Justin A.; Sato, Takahiro; Zhu, Xihe; Avery, Timothy
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, v111 n2 p135-147 Mar-Apr 2017
Introduction: Recently, researchers have explored the perspectives of those with disabilities to better understand their experiences in physical education. However, little has been done with focusing on those with visual impairments. Utilizing a qualitative interpretive phenomenological analysis framework, the purpose of this study was to examine the meaning that adults with visual impairments who attended residential schools for students who are blind ascribed to their physical education experiences. Methods: A group of five adult males who attended physical education at residential schools in the United States were purposely selected for this study. Data were collected via semistructured telephone interviews and reflective interview notes. Data were analyzed using a five-step analytical process, and recurring themes were summarized and presented as results. Results and discussion: Two broadly defined interrelated themes emerged from the participants' narratives. One theme, "being the only blind guy, to being one of the crowd," explained how differences in school settings contributed to the differences experienced by participants when attending residential and public or community schools. Cumulatively, participants described their residential school experiences as more inclusive and explained feelings of "being normal." The second theme, "the bullies and the bullied," explained the lived experiences of participants within the social dynamics of physical education environments and showed perceptions of those who were "able" and "less able." Results and discussion: Two broadly defined interrelated themes emerged from the participants' narratives. One theme, "being the only blind guy, to being one of the crowd," explained how differences in school settings contributed to the differences experienced by participants when attending residential and public or community schools. Cumulatively, participants described their residential school experiences as more inclusive and explained feelings of "being normal." The second theme, "the bullies and the bullied," explained the lived experiences of participants within the social dynamics of physical education environments and showed perceptions of those who were "able" and "less able." Furthermore, in addition to experiences of bullying in inclusive settings, practitioners must be aware of these instances in residential schools as well.
American Foundation for the Blind. 11 Penn Plaza Suite 300, New York, NY 10001. Tel: 800-232-5463; Tel: 212-502-7600; e-mail: afbinfo@afb.net; Web site: http://www.afb.org/store
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A