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ERIC Number: EJ1127675
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016-Dec
Pages: 7
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 26
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: EISSN-2353-9518
New Technologies as a Tool for Changing Academic Communities in the Global Context
Jankowska, Dorota; Tanas, Maciej
Comparative Professional Pedagogy, v6 n4 p34-40 Dec 2016
It has been defined that knowledge society emerges at the end of the twentieth century as the socio-economic structure characteristic for developed societies in which unlike in industrial societies, the dominant sector of economy is services and the largest social group is the "men of knowledge". It has been indicated that the development of the knowledge society is considered in connection with scientific and technological development and the expansion of new technologies as they determined is that we live in a globalized world, connected by a dense network of connections and intensive contacts both between the individuals and the authorities at local, regional, national and transnational or institutions level or between the institutions of various types, among which, of course, there are also educational institutions, including universities. It has been concluded that the accentuated thought should be read as a contemporary call for the implementation of the classic academic ideas in the conditions of the use of new technologies. Paraphrasing a metaphor of J. Morbitzer, modern university institutions should become intellectual arcs that will save humanity from the information deluge, the flood of endless, murky waves to safely bring it to the port of the society in which knowledge will be a resource for creative and innovative activities. A very important task is in the situation of current unprecedented acceleration of technical and technological progress not to lose the deep humanistic character of the educational process in which the modern technology should well serve a man and not contribute to its enslavement.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A