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ERIC Number: EJ1118981
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016-Nov
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0017-8969
EISSN: N/A
Adherence to a Depression Self-Care Intervention among Primary Care Patients with Chronic Physical Conditions: A Randomised Controlled Trial
McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G.; Yaffe, Mark; Strumpf, Erin; Sewitch, Maida; Sussman, Tamara; Ciampi, Antonio; Lavoie, Kim; Belzile, Eric
Health Education Journal, v75 n7 p767-779 Nov 2016
Objective: Among primary care patients with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms, to assess (1) the effect of lay telephone coaching on adherence to a psycho-educational intervention for depression, (2) demographic characteristics that predict adherence and (3) the association between adherence and 6-month outcomes. Design: Single blind randomised pragmatic trial of a lay telephone-supported depression self-care intervention compared to an unsupported intervention. Methods: All patients received a multimedia toolkit of paper and audiovisual materials on depression that provided education on depression and on self-care for depression. Core tools included a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based workbook and a mood monitoring notebook, with opportunities for written exercises and notes, and a video. Intervention group patients were additionally offered telephone coaching. Self-reported use of the materials was assessed at 3 and 6 months post-randomisation; 6-month outcomes were patient satisfaction and change from baseline in depression severity. Results: In all, 223 patients were randomised; 165 (74.0%) completed follow-up. Coached versus uncoached patients reported significantly greater use of the workbook, but not of other tools. Men used more audiovisual tools; women used more paper tools. Self-reported completion of written exercises and a greater number of coach contacts were associated with greater satisfaction, but not with improvement in depression. Conclusion: Telephone coaching can increase adherence to CBT-based tools for depression self-care; however, use of these tools may not improve depression outcomes. Many patients are capable of self-directed use of self-care educational materials. Sex differences in patterns of tool use may be helpful in the targeting of tools.
SAGE Publications. 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320. Tel: 800-818-7243; Tel: 805-499-9774; Fax: 800-583-2665; e-mail: journals@sagepub.com; Web site: http://sagepub.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Canada
Grant or Contract Numbers: N/A