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ERIC Number: EJ1104671
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016
Pages: N/A
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-9635
Suburban School Opens Elementary Campus in the Heart of Memphis: St. George's Independent School, Memphis, Tennessee
Stewart, Sarah
Independent School, v75 n4 Sum 2016
St. George's has nearly 1,150 students on three campuses: an elementary campus in Germantown and a middle/upper school campus in Collierville, both suburbs of Memphis, and a second elementary campus in Memphis. The Memphis campus serves 140 students in pre-K-5th grade. All Memphis campus students receive financial aid based on need, and approximately 60 percent qualify for free or reduced-price breakfast and lunch. Founded in 2001, this campus largely serves working class, African American families. To create a sense of community and camaraderie, students from the Memphis campus participate in events with their Germantown counterparts, who follow the same curriculum. In sixth grade, most Memphis campus students move to the Collierville campus to complete their K-12 education. The first class of students from the Memphis campus graduated in 2016. The Memphis campus is supported not only by charitable gifts and endowments but also by shared resources from the larger St. George's Independent School's community. The Memphis campus attracts applicants from more than 30 ZIP codes. The school regularly screens two to three times the number of students it has spots available for and maintains a waiting list. Opening the Memphis campus was a unique and complicated idea both logistically and because of the racial and socioeconomic divides in Memphis. It operates on a different business model than its counterparts, requiring different staff and strategy. Members of the school community work diligently to build relationships across these socioeconomic and racial differences so that all students may benefit. Communication, planning, and collaboration are essential components of success. This is one of five case studies from the National Association of Independent Schools about schools that are making nontraditional funding models work for the benefit of low-income students. [Online Feature]
National Association of Independent Schools. 1620 L Street NW Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20036. Tel: 800-793-6701; Tel: 202-973-9700; Fax: 202-973-9790; Web site: http://www.nais.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Tennessee (Memphis)