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ERIC Number: EJ1102709
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016
Pages: 16
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1360-3116
EISSN: N/A
The Discourse of Language Learning Strategies: Towards an Inclusive Approach
Jones, Alexander Harris
International Journal of Inclusive Education, v20 n8 p855-870 2016
This paper critiques discourse surrounding language learning strategies within Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and argues for the creation of new definitions of language learning strategies that are rooted in the socio-political and socio-economic contexts of the marginalized. Section one of this paper describes linguistic imperialism theory and post-colonial education's responses to allegations therein: multicultural education theory, critical race theory, and technological egalitarianism. This section also highlights the difference between formal and informal learning in order to validate multiple learning strategies. Section two of this paper then analyses two prominent works by Oxford [2002. "Language learning strategies around the world: Cross-cultural perspectives". Honolulu: Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center, University of Hawai'i at Manoa. 2013. "Language learning strategies: What every teacher should know". South Melbourne: Heinle Cengage Learning]. This section suggests that even though Oxford [2002. "Language learning strategies around the world: Cross-cultural perspectives". Honolulu: Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center, University of Hawai'i at Manoa] made attempts to incorporate diverse voices into language learning strategy theory, her efforts in turn potentiate those who already have access to education. Finally, the concluding section postulates five principles for including marginalized voices in the discourse of language learning strategies in order to propose contextualized definitions: (1) incorporate non-extractive research among the marginalized, (2) document local knowledges and practices in marginalized communities, (3) confront one's own identity of privilege before, during, and after research, (4) allow those on the margins to define learning strategies, and (5) develop diversity within TESOL.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Grant or Contract Numbers: N/A