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ERIC Number: EJ1089563
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016
Pages: 33
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 63
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1530-5058
Recursive Partitioning to Identify Potential Causes of Differential Item Functioning in Cross-National Data
Finch, W. Holmes; Hernández Finch, Maria E.; French, Brian F.
International Journal of Testing, v16 n1 p21-53 2016
Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is key in score validation. When DIF is present scores may not accurately reflect the construct of interest for some groups of examinees, leading to incorrect conclusions from the scores. Given rising immigration, and the increased reliance of educational policymakers on cross-national assessments such as Programme for International Student Assessment, Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study, and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS), DIF with regard to native language is of particular interest in this context. However, given differences in language and cultures, assuming similar cross-national DIF may lead to mistaken assumptions about the impact of immigration status, and native language on test performance. The purpose of this study was to use model-based recursive partitioning (MBRP) to investigate uniform DIF in PIRLS items across European nations. Results demonstrated that DIF based on mother's language was present for several items on a PIRLS assessment, but that the patterns of DIF were not the same across all nations.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Grade 4; Intermediate Grades; Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Progress in International Reading Literacy Study