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ERIC Number: EJ1087784
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015
Pages: N/A
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-9635
Independent Schools Examine Ways to Support Students' Sleep
Stewart, Sarah
Independent School, v75 n1 Fall 2015
Two-thirds of high school students get less than eight to 10 hours of sleep per night according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Sleep deprivation in teens has been linked to poor academic performance, reduced immunity, obesity, ADD-like symptoms, and even drug and alcohol use. For years, experts have said that early school schedules are at odds with adolescents' natural sleeping cycles. Still, schools have been resistant to consider changing their schedules. Working parents say they need to drop their children off early, and teachers worry about lost instruction time. However, in a study examining 40,000 middle and high schools, researchers from the CDC found that students who start school just 30 minutes later, at 8:30 a.m. instead of 8 a.m., see significant benefits in performance, attendance, and health and well-being. This article describes how schools in Florida, California, and Alabama have made changes in their schedules to help students get more sleep, or make better use of their time on and off campus. While some schools have made changes in their schedules, many more have added to their health and wellness curricula to teach students how to prioritize sleep and take better care of their health. This article describes how schools in Ohio and Georgia are focusing on their students' health and wellness in relation to the importance of getting enough sleep.
National Association of Independent Schools. 1620 L Street NW Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20036. Tel: 800-793-6701; Tel: 202-973-9700; Fax: 202-973-9790; Web site:
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Alabama; California; Florida; Georgia; Ohio