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ERIC Number: EJ1087548
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015-Dec
Pages: 16
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0039-8322
English, Tracking, and Neoliberalization of Education in South Korea
Byean, Hyera
TESOL Quarterly: A Journal for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages and of Standard English as a Second Dialect, v49 n4 p867-882 Dec 2015
Drawing upon the experiences and dilemmas of the author, a middle school English teacher in South Korea, this article illuminates the ways in which neoliberal reforms in education intersect with English, and how such links have entailed the class-based polarization of education in Korean society. Given the prominent role that English plays in neoliberal policies--namely, serving as a direct index of elite schools and track placement--unequal access to English across the class spectrum restricts the prospects of disadvantaged students in the neoliberal education market. Tracking is one way in which this unequal access is manifest in the Korean educational landscape. "Tracking" refers to placing students in accordance with their academic abilities in order to tailor instruction to best meet students' needs (Oakes, 1985). Contrary to its intended purpose, however, tracking has been vehemently criticized for exacerbating educational inequalities (Gamoran, 2010; Hallam & Ireson, 2005; Oakes, 1985; Oakes, Gamoran, & Page, 1992). By locating the tracking policy against the backdrop of the local significance of English, this article identifies hidden agendas underlying tracking practices surrounding English, and further highlights how the interplay of English and neoliberalism mediates relations of class and inequality while justifying policies and practices surrounding English as the imperatives of globalization.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: South Korea