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ERIC Number: EJ1084571
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016-Jan
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: EISSN-1541-4329
EISSN: N/A
Implementing Student-Centered Learning Practices in a Large Enrollment, Introductory Food Science and Human Nutrition Course
Korte, Debra; Reitz, Nicholas; Schmidt, Shelly J.
Journal of Food Science Education, v15 n1 p23-33 Jan 2016
Informed by the latest research on how people learn, effective teachers address both aspects of the teaching-learning equation--they engage students in the course material by implementing best teaching practices and they prepare students for learning by sharing best learning practices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of student-centered learning practices on students' perceptions of their ability to learn, specifically in a large enrollment, introductory food science and human nutrition course. Featured student-centered learning practices included required assignments, optional study tools, and supplemental learning resources. A mixed method survey instrument with 5-point Likert scales and qualitative, open-ended questions was used to determine students' (1) use of optional study tools and supplemental learning resources; (2) perceptions as to the quality and impact of required assignments, optional study tools, and supplemental learning resources to enhance their ability to learn; (3) perceptions as to the usefulness of required assignments, optional study tools, and supplemental learning resources to help them perform better in this course; and (4) overall satisfaction, as a learner, in this course. Overall, students identified study guides (developed using Bloom's taxonomy action verbs) (Mean = 4.34), microthemes (Mean = 4.27), and quizzes (Mean = 4.11) as the most beneficial resources to enhance their learning of the course material. Overall, 85% of students said they were "extremely" or "very satisfied" as learners in the course and nearly 75% of the students said the student-centered learning practices should be offered to future FSHN 101 students. Practical Implication: The terms teaching and learning are often used interchangeably. However, it is important to recognize that, ultimately, teaching is the responsibility of the teacher and learning is the responsibility of the student, since from a biological perspective, learning takes place via physical changes in the learner's brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of student-centered learning practices on students' perceptions of their ability to learn. Helping students learn how to learn will not only enhance their effectiveness as students, but should also enhance their effectiveness as future food industry employees.
Wiley-Blackwell. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8598; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com; Web site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Grant or Contract Numbers: N/A