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ERIC Number: EJ1063317
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009-Jan
Pages: 26
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1540-4595
Investigating Business Schools' Intentions about Offering E-Commerce Education Using an Extended Theory of Planned Behavior
Dodor, Jean Baptiste K.; Rana, Dharam S.
Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, v7 n1 p195-220 Jan 2009
This study investigates business schools' intentions about offering e-commerce education (ECE) using an extended theory of planned behavior (ETPB). The need for an adequate match between future supply and demand of e-commerce skills constitutes the main motivation for the study. The results show that most business schools consider ECE important for an adequate preparation of their students for today's competitive labor market. In addition, the proposed ETPB fits well the empirical data and predicts 65.2% of the variances in the schools' intentions about offering ECE. The results can help business schools in their curriculum decisions in at least two ways: (1) through the likely effect of social contagion and (2) through the constructs in the ETPB. First, institutional theory clearly indicates that organizations tend to adopt a new behavior when there is evidence that other organizations in their population have adopted or are likely to adopt that behavior. Having provided such evidence for ECE, this study is likely to promote the adoption of this educational product innovation. Second, the fact that the postulated ETPB fits well the empirical data suggests that administrators of business schools may pay attention to the key constructs when making curriculum decisions. Overall, the study has both theoretical and practical implications. Theoretically, it contributes to a growing literature on the adoption of innovative educational products like ECE. Practically, it provides valuable insights that administrators of business schools can use in their strategic curriculum decision making.
Wiley-Blackwell. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8598; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com; Web site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A