NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ1062938
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1539-9664
Boot Camps for Charter Boards
Kronholz, June
Education Next, v15 n3 p40-46 Sum 2015
This article addresses the question of who owns the responsibility when a charter school gets into trouble--when its students aren't learning, or it misses its enrollment targets, or money runs short, or it closes. Upon presenting this question to a director of a charter school, a board member, and a Massachusetts-based education consultant and entrepreneur, author June Kronholz writes that there appears to be a consensus of opinions that the failure of a charter is ultimately the failure of the board. Which is why an organization called Charter Board Partners (CBP) gathered a World Bank strategist, a couple of advertising executives, a behavioral psychologist, a retired English teacher, a former Exxon executive, and perhaps two dozen other professionals for what it called a governance boot camp. CBP's boot camp began simply enough with a lecture on what, exactly, a charter school is. The discussion quickly moved to governance nuts and bolts: committee organization, budget oversight, school-leader evaluations, and, by afternoon, a mock charter-school board meeting. Since its 2010 launch, Charter Board Partners has recruited, trained, and placed 100 people like these onto D.C. charter-school boards. At the end of this boot camp, another 67 candidates were ready to join boards that ask for them. About two dozen boards--not quite half of the charter-school boards in D.C.--already contract with CBP, paying up to $15,000 a year for CBP's matchmaking services, governance workshops, personal coach, and help with such problems as how to "preplan" a school leader's succession, or how to move board paperwork online. In addition to recruiting and coaching boards, CBP provides its subscribers with professional development through a library of online training tools.
Hoover Institution. Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-6010. Tel: 800-935-2882; Fax: 650-723-8626; e-mail: educationnext@hoover.stanford.edu; Web site: http://educationnext.org/journal/
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: District of Columbia