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ERIC Number: EJ1062737
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015
Pages: N/A
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-9635
The Big Disconnect: Your Student in Class vs. Your Student Online
Steiner-Adair, Catherine
Independent School, v74 n2 Win 2015
Catherine Steiner-Adair, clinical psychologist, has consulted for more than 350 independent and public schools, parents, and students, on a wide range of topics related to strengthening children's social and emotional development, shaping school culture, and deepening parents' connections to their children. Four years ago, she was able to collect data and do research at 30 schools on the impact of technology on the psychological health of children and adolescents and the quality of community in their school cultures. Her research turned out to be a basis for her book, "The Big Disconnect: Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age." Since then, much of her work in areas such as school culture, social-emotional learning, faculty training, parent education, and integrating technology has expanded to address challenges raised not only in schools, but increasingly after school within the student's family and in the larger extended school community. This article emphasizes an additional focus: the dual online/offline lives of students, the psychological fallout, and the need to clarify parent and school responsibilities when students engage online in schoolwork and social media. As students text, post, or hang out online, often working on school assignments together, they are sending messages and content that they would never share at school, often using language that they would never say to someone's face. These behaviors can be difficult, hurtful, sometimes hateful, and provide a distressing introduction to life's hardest lessons. Such negative interactions can also have a detrimental effect on student learning and relationships. From her work with students, the author has learned that whether 8, 12 or 17 years old, students want to learn how to manage their social selves, how to respond thoughtfully, assertively, and effectively, and in a way that feels responsible and mature on line and in real life. The article calls for schools to balance increased tech use with stronger programs in social-emotional learning and other steps to help students manage their dual lives in their bicultural online/offline school community.
National Association of Independent Schools. 1620 L Street NW Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20036. Tel: 800-793-6701; Tel: 202-973-9700; Fax: 202-973-9790; Web site: http://www.nais.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A