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ERIC Number: EJ1060021
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015-Apr
Pages: 14
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1092-4388
Kinematic Measurements of the Vocal-Fold Displacement Waveform in Typical Children and Adult Populations: Quantification of High-Speed Endoscopic Videos
Patel, Rita; Donohue, Kevin D.; Unnikrishnan, Harikrishnan; Kryscio, Richard J.
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, v58 n2 p227-240 Apr 2015
Purpose: This article presents a quantitative method for assessing instantaneous and average lateral vocal-fold motion from high-speed digital imaging, with a focus on developmental changes in vocal-fold kinematics during childhood. Method: Vocal-fold vibrations were analyzed for 28 children (aged 5-11 years) and 28 adults (aged 21-45 years) without voice disorders. The following kinematic features were analyzed from the vocal-fold displacement waveforms: relative velocity-based features (normalized average and peak opening and closing velocities), relative acceleration-based features (normalized peak opening and closing accelerations), speed quotient, and normalized peak displacement. Results: Children exhibited significantly larger normalized peak displacements, normalized average and peak opening velocities, normalized average and peak closing velocities, peak opening and closing accelerations, and speed quotient compared to adult women. Values of normalized average closing velocity and speed quotient were higher in children compared to adult men. Conclusions: When compared to adult men, developing children typically have higher estimates of kinematic features related to normalized displacement and its derivatives. In most cases, the kinematic features of children are closer to those of adult men than adult women. Even though boys experience greater changes in glottal length and pitch as they mature, results indicate that girls experience greater changes in kinematic features compared to boys.
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Tel: 800-638-8255; Fax: 301-571-0457; e-mail: subscribe@asha.org; Web site: http://jslhr.asha.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Authoring Institution: N/A
IES Grant or Contract Numbers: R03DC11360