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ERIC Number: EJ1059671
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015-May
Pages: 20
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0958-3440
Language Learner Perspectives on the Functionality and Use of Electronic Language Dictionaries
Levy, Mike; Steel, Caroline
ReCALL, v27 n2 p177-196 May 2015
This paper investigates the extent of electronic dictionary use by language learners in an Australian university. All students in the study are formally enrolled in language courses across ten languages at first, second or third year level. The study places a particular emphasis on gauging student perceptions of the beneficial aspects of electronic dictionaries as judged by learners themselves in circumstances where they are able to act independently. As these benefits are often described in terms of "usability" and "functionality," these particular terms are defined and introduced in the literature review, and then later they are employed to help structure and describe the results. The arguments for the discussion are supported by the use of empirical data taken from a large-scale survey conducted in 2011 (n = 587) where comments from students were obtained on why and how dictionary-type resources were accessed and used (see also Steel & Levy, 2013). The paper restricts itself to the quantitative and qualitative data gathered on mobile phones, translators, dictionaries and web conjugators and related items (e.g. discussion forums). The particular functions that students use and the ways in which they use them are described and categorised, with the discussion supported by student comments. The data exhibits a remarkable range of resources available to students to look up unknown words or to see translations and, consequently, our understanding of what exactly an electronic dictionary might comprise is challenged. Many students' comments demonstrate a sophistication and knowledge about the effective use of these dictionary tools together with a keen awareness of their limitations.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Australia