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ERIC Number: EJ1058426
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 20
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 36
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-2375-2033
Using Photos and Visual-Processing Assistive Technologies to Develop Self-Expression and Interpersonal Communication of Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (AS)
Shrieber, Betty; Cohen, Yael
Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects, v9 p267-286 2013
The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of photographs and assistive technologies for visual information processing as motivating tools for interpersonal communication of adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (AS), aged 16 to 18 years, attending special education school. Students with AS find it very difficult to create social and interpersonal relationships, express their emotions, understand the feeling and thoughts of others, and to interpret them into social codes. They are also visual learners, so it is important to use a variety of visual tools to develop their communication skills and expression. Visual assistive technology, such as photographs, video clips, and visual processing software (e.g., Picasa), was used in this research to enhance the students' communication skills. The findings show that use of photographs and assistive technology tools does indeed create an incentive for dialogue and helps students spontaneously share their memories and emotions. Certain activities motivated dialogue, openness, and sharing, deepened knowledge of each other, encouraged self-reflection and awareness of image and impression of one's surroundings, while also clarifying those communicative difficulties so common among AS students, and providing an opportunity to discuss and treat them. Although it is not possible to reliably separate the photography sessions from the overall school experience and credit these friendships entirely to classroom meetings, it is clear that such meetings significantly contributed to developing bonds, openness and collaboration, deepened familiarity with classmates, and strengthened self-image. The discourse that formed around the photos and clip raised awareness and helped each participant identify their strengths.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A