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ERIC Number: EJ1053739
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 30
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1941-1391
Improving Education in the Developing World: What Have We Learned from Randomized Evaluations?
Kremer, Michael; Holla, Alaka
Annual Review of Economics, v1 p513-542 Sep 2009
Across a range of contexts, reductions in education costs and provision of subsidies can boost school participation, often dramatically. Decisions to attend school seem subject to peer effects and time-inconsistent preferences. Merit scholarships, school health programs, and information about returns to education can all cost-effectively spur school participation. However, distortions in education systems, such as weak teacher incentives and elite-oriented curricula, undermine learning in school and much of the impact of increasing existing educational spending. Pedagogical innovations designed to address these distortions (such as technology-assisted instruction, remedial education, and tracking by achievement) can raise test scores at a low cost. Merely informing parents about school conditions seems insufficient to improve teacher incentives, and evidence on merit pay is mixed, but hiring teachers locally on short-term contracts can save money and improve educational outcomes. School vouchers can cost-effectively increase both school participation and learning.
Annual Reviews. PO Box 10139, Palo Alto, CA 94303. e-mail: service@annualreviews.org; Web site: http://www.annualreviews.org/journal/economics
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A