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ERIC Number: EJ1051631
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015-Feb
Pages: 12
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1072-0502
Isolating the Incentive Salience of Reward-Associated Stimuli: Value, Choice, and Persistence
Beckmann, Joshua S.; Chow, Jonathan J.
Learning & Memory, v22 n2 p116-127 Feb 2015
Sign- and goal-tracking are differentially associated with drug abuse-related behavior. Recently, it has been hypothesized that sign- and goal-tracking behavior are mediated by different neurobehavioral valuation systems, including differential incentive salience attribution. Herein, we used different conditioned stimuli to preferentially elicit different response types to study the different incentive valuation characteristics of stimuli associated with sign- and goal-tracking within individuals. The results demonstrate that all stimuli used were equally effective conditioned stimuli; however, only a lever stimulus associated with sign-tracking behavior served as a robust conditioned reinforcer and was preferred over a tone associated with goal-tracking. Moreover, the incentive value attributed to the lever stimulus was capable of promoting suboptimal choice, leading to a significant reduction in reinforcers (food) earned. Furthermore, sign-tracking to a lever was more persistent than goal-tracking to a tone under omission and extinction contingencies. Finally, a conditional discrimination procedure demonstrated that sign-tracking to a lever and goal-tracking to a tone were dependent on learned stimulus-reinforcer relations. Collectively, these results suggest that the different neurobehavioral valuation processes proposed to govern sign- and goal-tracking behavior are independent but parallel processes within individuals. Examining these systems within individuals will provide a better understanding of how one system comes to dominate stimulus-reward learning, thus leading to the differential role these systems play in abuse-related behavior.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. 500 Sunnyside Boulevard, Woodbury, NY 11797-2924. Tel: 800-843-4388; Tel: 516-367-8800; Fax: 516-422-4097; e-mail: cshpres@cshl.edu; Web site: http://www.learnmem.org/
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A