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ERIC Number: EJ1049069
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 11
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1094-9046
Prove It! Putting Together the Evidence-Based Practice Puzzle
Little, Hannah Byrd
Knowledge Quest, v43 n3 p62-67 Jan-Feb 2015
Why is it important to prove that school libraries add value to the school program? The National Center for Education Statistics reports that 20 percent of U.S. public schools lack a full or part-time certified librarian (NCES 2013). In California the ratio of certified school librarians to students is 1:7,374 (California Department of Education 2014). Can the school library profession prove that school libraries are indispensable for a 21st-century education even though information is only a few clicks away? How can researchers and practitioners provide strong evidence to support their claims? What are the critical questions? Where is the evidence? Test scores are not the only measure of student achievement. School librarians need to look for evidence in teaching and learning practices in their schools so that students can not only get into college but have success once they enroll. This article describes one school library program, The Capstone Project, that requires senior students to conduct primary research and present their projects to the student body. Seniors must use peer-reviewed research for their background reading. Students collect evidence using surveys, interviews, tests, experiments, case studies, journals, and internships. Students must prove that their proposed theories are viable. The educators at this school want to make certain no senior leaves high school without knowing how to conduct college-level research. While the Capstone project began as a way to prepare students for college and careers, it is also a vehicle for evidence-based practice. School librarians can create instructional programs that shift the emphasis from testing for right or wrong answers to assessing critical thinking and advanced information skills.
American Association of School Librarians. Available from: American Library Association. 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL 60611. Tel: 1-800-545-2433; Web site: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/knowledgequest/knowledgequest.cfm
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A