NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ1049033
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2015
Pages: 4
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 15
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1094-9046
New Territory for School Library Research: Let the Data Speak
Subramaniam, Mega
Knowledge Quest, v43 n3 p16-19 Jan-Feb 2015
A seminal dialogue on evidence based practice (EBP) at the International Association of School Librarianship in 2001 encouraged a worldwide paradigm shift in school librarianship from rhetorical and advocacy defenses to evidential documentation. Ross Todd described EBP as evidence for practice, evidence in practice, and evidence of practice (Todd 2006, 2008) "to collectively represent a holistic and integrated framework for professional practice that is robust, reflective and regenerative" (Todd 2006, 36). Since then school librarians have demonstrated their impact on reading and writing. However, evidence of their impact on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) achievement is rarely discussed or shared. School librarians spend less time with STEM content because: (1) They typically have undergraduate degrees in social sciences and language arts, which results in discomfort with STEM content; (2) They do not believe they have expertise in STEM; and (3) STEM teachers discount school librarians' expertise to serve as their instructional partners (Subramaniam and Edwards 2014). This article pursues a line of thinking that school librarians can collaborate with STEM teachers and be instructional partners in mathematical and scientific content areas. With their knowledge and expertise in media and technology, school librarians can encourage students to envision application of STEM practices in their daily lives and inspire them to become scientists and engineers (Subramaniam et al. 2012). It takes a community of researchers, school librarians, educators, and professional organizations to cultivate and sustain EBP in STEM subjects.
American Association of School Librarians. Available from: American Library Association. 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL 60611. Tel: 1-800-545-2433; Web site: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/knowledgequest/knowledgequest.cfm
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A