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ERIC Number: EJ1041415
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Mar
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 24
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0047-231X
Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies
Pai, Aditi
Journal of College Science Teaching, v43 n4 p63-67 Mar 2014
A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of teaching the case study method with videos. The first and the easiest strategy is to start by adapting videos that are already available for free on the internet from sites such as You-Tube, PBS.org, and Google Videos for use in conjunction with published text-based cases. Another effective use of videos is to pick one with the purpose of expanding the scope of a published text-based case. A second, "hybrid" approach is to use videos as part of multipart, multimedia case study stories that require videos, readings, and perhaps even social media such as Facebook for students' input. An equally easy third option is to construct a case study from different videos that are already available. A simple way to customize it for one's class is to set the scenario of a case, such as a debate or a dilemma, with a quick personal video (made with a cellphone or an iPad) and then build the rest of the case with existing videos from YouTube. The fourth option is to script and shoot whole video cases yourself. This is more challenging than fashioning case studies with existing videos, so the author uses this method only when she is unable to locate existing material. This article also provides information on how to locate appropriate videos and the pros and cons associated with using this method.
National Science Teachers Association. 1840 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22201-3000. Tel: 800-722-6782; Fax: 703-243-3924; e-mail: membership@nsta.org; Web site: http://www.nsta.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A