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ERIC Number: EJ1035698
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Jul
Pages: 12
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1072-0502
NMDA Receptor- and ERK-Dependent Histone Methylation Changes in the Lateral Amygdala Bidirectionally Regulate Fear Memory Formation
Gupta-Agarwal, Swati; Jarome, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Jordan; Lubin, Farah D.
Learning & Memory, v21 n7 p351-362 Jul 2014
It is well established that fear memory formation requires de novo gene transcription in the amygdala. We provide evidence that epigenetic mechanisms in the form of histone lysine methylation in the lateral amygdala (LA) are regulated by NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling and involved in gene transcription changes necessary for fear memory consolidation. Here we found increases in histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) levels in the LA at 1 h following auditory fear conditioning, which continued to be temporally regulated up to 25 h following behavioral training. Additionally, we demonstrate that inhibiting the H3K9me2 histone lysine methyltransferase G9a (H/KMTs-G9a) in the LA impaired fear memory, while blocking the H3K9me2 histone lysine demethylase LSD1 (H/KDM-LSD1) enhanced fear memory, suggesting that H3K9me2 in the LA can bidirectionally regulate fear memory formation. Furthermore, we show that NMDAR activity differentially regulated the recruitment of H/KMT-G9a, H/KDM-LSD1, and subsequent H3K9me2 levels at a target gene promoter. This was largely regulated by GluN2B- but not GluN2A-containing NMDARs via ERK activation. Moreover, fear memory deficits associated with NMDAR or ERK blockade were successfully rescued through pharmacologically inhibiting LSD1, suggesting that enhancements of H3K9me2 levels within the LA can rescue fear memory impairments that result from hypofunctioning NMDARs or loss of ERK signaling. Together, the present study suggests that histone lysine methylation regulation in the LA via NMDAR-ERK-dependent signaling is involved in fear memory formation.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. 500 Sunnyside Boulevard, Woodbury, NY 11797-2924. Tel: 800-843-4388; Tel: 516-367-8800; Fax: 516-422-4097; e-mail: cshpres@cshl.edu; Web site: http://www.learnmem.org/
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A