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ERIC Number: EJ1033962
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Oct
Pages: 7
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0036-8148
Science 101: What Causes Electromagnetic Induction?
Robertson, Bill
Science and Children, v51 n2 p76-78 Oct 2013
Electromagnetic induction is the technical name for the fact that, when a wire is moved near a magnet or a magnet is moved near a wire, an electric current flows in the wire. Although Bill Robertson honestly admits to not knowing why this happens, he does say that it is possible to get a deeper understanding of what's going on in terms of science concepts. He demonstrates this by describing an activity that employs a toy train transformer or toy racing set transformer, along with the wires that connect to the track. When the transformer is switched on, the wires that are right next to each other should move toward each other slightly. When the transformer is switched off, they should move back to where they were. What this illustrates is that moving electrons exert forces on other moving electrons. How does it illustrate that? Well, when a transformer is turned on and the wires form a complete circuit, an electric current flows in the wires. This electric current is nothing more than electrons moving slowly through the wires. So, the two wires that are next to each other being attracted shows that moving electrons in the wire exert forces on other moving electrons in another wire. Electromagnetic induction does not involve two wires carrying an electric current. It involves wire and magnets moving relative to each other. It is important to understand the basics of electromagnetic conduction because virtually all the electricity we use day today, with the exception of that produced by solar panels and batteries, comes from electromagnetic induction.
National Science Teachers Association. 1840 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22201-3000. Tel: 800-722-6782; Fax: 703-243-3924; e-mail: membership@nsta.org; Web site: http://www.nsta.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A