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ERIC Number: EJ1033705
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Sep
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 3
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0036-8148
The Moon Challenge
Fitzsimmons, Pat; Leddy, Diana; Johnson, Lindy; Biggam, Sue; Locke, Suzan
Science and Children, v51 n1 p36-41 Sep 2013
This article describes a first-grade research project that incorporates trade books and challenges misconceptions. Educators see the power of their students' wonder at work in their classrooms on a daily basis. This wonder must be nourished by students' own experiences--observing the moon on a crystal clear night--as well as by having their understanding informed by the thinking and experiences of others. The questions scientists ask require collective inquiry and accumulated knowledge, the thoughtful analysis and synthesis of many minds. Work in classrooms must be integrated across science and English language arts to meaningfully connect scientific inquiry with analytic reading, writing, and research skills. A group of Vermont educators decided to take on the challenge of integrating science and literacy by developing a first-grade research project about the Moon. Working from the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) disciplinary core idea ESS1.A, which states that students will be able to describe and predict patterns of motion of the sun, moon, and stars, the educators narrowed the topic and developed a research question: When you look at the moon, how does the shape seem to change over time? The lesson sequence, which combined observation and work with nonfiction texts, was designed to help students observe patterns of change and understand that although the shape of the moon appears to change, it really remains the same. Work in this unit centers on the crosscutting concept of patterns and employs the science practices of asking questions; developing and using models; analyzing and interpreting data; and obtaining, evaluating and communicating information.
National Science Teachers Association. 1840 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22201-3000. Tel: 800-722-6782; Fax: 703-243-3924; e-mail: membership@nsta.org; Web site: http://www.nsta.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Grade 1; Primary Education; Elementary Education; Early Childhood Education
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A