NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ1033527
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Jun
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0036-6811
The Presidential Address 2014. Teaching and Learning: The Long View
Roberts, Alice
School Science Review, v95 n353 p21-25 Jun 2014
This article presents the transcript of the Presidential Address delivered to the Association for Science Education Annual Conference held at the University of Birmingham in January 2014. In her address, Alice Roberts traces the evolution of various features that are often thought to make humans different from other animals. Examples such as bipedalism, smiling and laughing, and an over-inflated brain are discussed. This leads to an examination of the "Theory of Mind" (the ability to think about what other individuals are thinking about and read their minds), culture, and teaching. Here is where Roberts determines humans are truly unique from other animals. While there is evidence of some kind of teaching in other animals--in cats, meerkats, some ants and chimpanzees, it seems to be based on or aimed at changing behaviour rather than changing a mind. She indicates this is where humans seem to stand apart: humans teach in this more narrow definition of the activity (sometimes called pedagogy) which is informed by the Theory of Mind. In other species, teaching is also something which happens sporadically. In contrast, teaching appears to be universal in human societies. After tracing the evolution of teaching from 2.5 million years ago to the present, Roberts concludes that while the opportunities that technology provides the field of education should be taken advantage of, the more traditional ways of teaching and learning should also be preserved and used. The reason being that face-to-face interaction between teacher and student, that intensely personal process where the teacher is reading the students' mind, is still important. It's still one of the best ways of learning, alongside all of the wonderful technology that has been invented and passed on to help the process.
Association for Science Education. College Lane Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AA, UK. Tel: +44-1-707-283000; Fax: +44-1-707-266532; e-mail: info@ase.org.uk; Web site: http://www.ase.org.uk
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A