NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ1032733
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Dec
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0036-6811
Teaching Health and Safety through Science
School Science Review, v95 n351 p29-34 Dec 2013
Experimental and investigative work has been an integral element in the teaching of science in schools for many years. Although students have always been taught to work safely, there is now a more general requirement that they will be taught about health and safety and how it should be implemented. That is, they must understand something of the principles of health and safety, which is more than learning how to follow a set of safe working instructions. The general requirement for students to learn about health and safety applies across the curriculum, not just in science. However, teaching and learning science offers many opportunities for students to learn about health and safety in a "live" practical situation that can provide them with insights into health and safety in general. Emphasising health and safety at work is a good idea, despite how it is frequently portrayed and undermined in the media. The requirement for health and safety in the laboratory or classroom is sometimes misconstrued as an obstacle to developing practical approaches to science in schools and colleges. However, recognising hazards, assessing risk and working safely are important skills, not only in the school laboratory but also at home and at work. They contribute to the general health and safety education of the school population. No less importantly, such skills also allow students to safely carry out the kind of experimental and investigative science that they often enjoy. This article provides tips on how to go about teaching health and safety principles to students and describes two examples of providing students with the skills, knowledge and understanding to recognise how and why health and safety are important. [This article was written by the ASE Health and Safety Group.]
Association for Science Education. College Lane Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AA, UK. Tel: +44-1-707-283000; Fax: +44-1-707-266532; e-mail: info@ase.org.uk; Web site: http://www.ase.org.uk
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A