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ERIC Number: EJ1023313
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 5
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0892-4562
Implementing Active Homework in Secondary Physical Education
St. Ours, Elizabeth; Scrabis-Fletcher, Kristin A.
Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, v26 n6 p23-27 2013
During the past decade, physical education has gone through some tough times. Between increased pressures to succeed on standardized testing, which has resulted in increased classroom time and decreased time in the gym, and tight budgets, children are not getting the quality physical education they deserve. The "2012 Shape of the Nation Report" revealed that only 13 states require a minimum weekly amount of physical activity time for middle school students (National Association for Sport and Physical Education [NASPE] & American Heart Association, 2012). Given these findings and the fact that 32% of students are watching television and 31% are using computers three or more hours a day in an average school day (NASPE & American Heart Association, 2012), it is no wonder the United States has so many overweight children. Unfortunately, this puts physical educators in the position of having to prove that their job is necessary. The best way to justify physical education is to share with others the many benefits of being physically active as well as provide quality physical education to children. One way to improve a physical education program is to incorporate the use of active homework. By implementing homework, not only are you able to place more attention on the cognitive domain, which is often overlooked, but you are also able to better reinforce skills and concepts learned in class, which can be especially useful when you have limited class time (Gabbei & Hamrick, 2001). Homework is also an assessment tool that provides teachers with evidence for grades, which many experts deem necessary (Gallo et al., 2006). This article provides examples of active homework that can be implemented in any secondary physical education program.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Journal Articles
Education Level: Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A