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ERIC Number: EJ1022522
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 14
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 26
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1461-3808
Self-Invented Notation Systems Created by Young Children
Lee, Pyng-Na
Music Education Research, v15 n4 p392-405 2013
This longitudinal study investigated self-invented notation systems created by young children aged four to six. The researcher showed the children how to feel various pitches and rhythms through singing, eurhythmy, instrumental playing, rhymes and music appreciation. The children were then provided with opportunities to create music notations and share them with peers, all without showing any conventional musical notations by the researcher. A method of qualitative study was employed, and the data from the children's notations and interviews were collected and analysed. The results found that children employed quantitative sizing, graphic patterns and literal symbols as notational strategies to create systems to notate pitches or rhythms. When children simultaneously notated pitches and rhythms, they created two modes for writing music. First, they employed one notation system, as mentioned above, to write pitches and added indications such as dots, underlines or circles to refer to different timing. Secondly, the children combined two systems to write pitches and rhythms such as combining two graphic patterns, combining a graphic pattern and literal symbols, combining a graphic pattern and conventional rhythmic notations or combining conventional rhythmic notations and literal symbols. These self-invented notation systems document how young children's musical thinking becomes more complex through exploring notational strategies.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Kindergarten
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Taiwan