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ERIC Number: EJ1022194
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 13
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 13
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1522-8959
Understanding Information Anxiety and How Academic Librarians Can Minimize Its Effects
Eklof, Ashley
Public Services Quarterly, v9 n3 p246-258 2013
Information anxiety is a serious issue that has the potential to hinder the success of a large percentage of the population in both education and professional settings. It has become more prevalent as societies begin to focus more on the value of technology, multitasking, and instant information access. The majority of the population has felt, to some degree, feelings of information anxiety, though they may not understand how these feelings begin. Librarians, as the "caretakers of information," are taking it upon themselves to inform the population that such a thing as information anxiety does exist and that they are taking proactive measures to provide patrons with the tools needed to overcome it. This article delves into some of these issues as well as the changes academic librarians are hoping to make. First, information anxiety is defined in terms of how it affects the population in this modern society. Information anxiety is also isolated from the similar sounding term "library anxiety," which is defined separately. Technology and multitasking play an important role in the formation of information anxiety and are discussed accordingly. This article also addresses the variety of scenarios that can contribute to the development of information anxiety and how academic librarians can combat the spread of information anxiety in this technology saturated world.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Journal Articles
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A