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ERIC Number: EJ1022159
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 4
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 6
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1529-0824
Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs
Henneman, Suzanne E.
Journal of Dance Education, v13 n3 spec iss p108-111 2013
The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical thinkers, but it is not without its challenges. This article aims to guide dance teachers and administrators and those who administrate or are considering administration of dance education programs. The intent is to help answer questions regarding administration of dance education such as these: What constitutes best practices in dance education from an administrative perspective? How does one create and develop a vision, craft and develop new programs, and more important, navigate the bureaucratic system that might hinder or help launch such programs? As a classroom dance educator for 21 years first, and subsequently a resource teacher with supervisory and administrative responsibilities for 14 years, Suzanne Henneman had the distinct privilege, and sometimes daunting mission, to guide the development of a dance education program grounded in arts education in a large public school system. The "how to" approach is based on the collective 35 years as a dance educator and administrator in Baltimore County Public Schools. One of the first orders of business in creating a dance program is to craft the vision, mission, and belief statements, followed by a description of the implications of the first three orders of business. A vision statement will help to frame and steer the process of creating a high-quality fine arts dance education program. In this article, Henneman takes the reader through each of these steps in detail.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Teachers; Administrators
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A