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ERIC Number: EJ1020547
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: N/A
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-9635
Rescuing Education: The Rise of Experiential Learning
McKenzie, Malcolm
Independent School, v72 n3 Spr 2013
The term "experiential education" can be--and has been--applied to a wide range of educational programming. Malcolm McKenzie's working definition of experiential education is this: it promotes learning through direct experience, often outside the classroom, at times not directly related to academic courses, frequently not graded, and sometimes not mediated through language or academic discourse and practice. In this article, McKenzie writes that its roots are often traced to a saying commonly attributed to Confucius around 450 BC (although it more likely belongs to the Confucian philosopher Xunzi): "Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand." More recently (1984), educational theorist David Kolb updated this insight, saying, "Learning is the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience." Many other dicta similarly describe the deep learning that occurs through direct experience, through doing. This article, derived from the author's address at the 2012 Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) Conference, explores how systemic overviews of educational practice, within and across nations, tend to neglect experiential education and often miss the mark. The article argues that doing things, often outdoors and in groups, is a vital antidote to childhood and adolescent lifestyles that are increasingly virtual and insular, and ought to be rescued because there is a place for both academic learning and experiential learning in schools.["Rescuing Education: The Rise of Experiential Learning" was illustrated by Rich Lillash.]
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A