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ERIC Number: EJ1020061
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Jan
Pages: 17
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 50
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0958-3440
Language-Related Computer Use: Focus on Young L2 English Learners in Sweden
Sundqvist, Pia; Sylvén, Liss Kerstin
ReCALL, v26 n1 p3-20 Jan 2014
This paper presents findings from a study investigating young English language learners (YELLs) in Sweden in 4th grade (N = 76, aged 10-11). Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire and a one-week language diary. The main purpose was to examine the learners' L2 English language-related activities outside of school in general, and their use of computers and engagement in playing digital games in particular. A comparison is made between language-related activities in English, Swedish, and other languages. Another purpose was to see whether there is a relationship between playing digital games and (a) gender, (b) L1, (c) motivation for learning English, (d) self-assessed English ability, and (e) self-reported strategies for speaking English. In order to do so, the sample was divided into three digital game groups, (1) non-gamers, (2) moderate, and (3) frequent gamers (greater than or equal to 4 hours/week), based on diary data (using self-reported times for "playing digital games" in English). Results showed that YELLs are extensively involved in extramural English (EE) activities (M = 7.2 hrs/w). There are statistically significant gender differences, boys (11.5 hrs/w) and girls (5.1 hrs/w; "p" < 0.01), the reason being boys' greater time investment in digital gaming and watching films. The girls, on the other hand, spent significantly more time on pastime language-related activities in Swedish (11.5 hrs/w) than the boys (8.0 hrs/w; "p" < 0.05), the reason being girls' greater time investment in facebooking. Investigation of the digital game groups revealed that group (1) was predominantly female, (2) a mix, and (3) predominantly male. YELLs with an L1 other than Swedish were overrepresented in group (3). Motivation and self-assessed English ability were high across all groups. Finally, regarding the self-reported strategies, code-switching to one's L1 was more commonly reported by non- and moderate gamers than frequent gamers.
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Publication Type: Reports - Research; Journal Articles
Education Level: Grade 4; Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Sweden