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ERIC Number: EJ1018766
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Mar
Pages: 37
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0272-2631
Exploring Learner Perception and Use of Task-Based Interactional Feedback in FTF and CMC Modes
Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura; Baralt, Melissa
Studies in Second Language Acquisition, v36 n1 p1-37 Mar 2014
Theoretical claims about the benefits of corrective feedback have been largely premised on learners' noticing of feedback (e.g., Gass & Mackey, 2006; Long, 1996; Schmidt, 1990, 1995; Swain, 1995), and findings have demonstrated that both the feedback target (Mackey, Gass, & McDonough, 2000) and the mode of provision (Lai & Zhao, 2006) can affect learners' accurate perception of feedback. The current study extended this research by investigating learners' perception and use of feedback provided in task-based interaction in both computer-mediated (CMC) and face-to-face (FTF) modes. Utilizing stimulated recall, the study examined if 24 intermediate-level learners of Spanish as a foreign language accurately noticed feedback as feedback, if they noticed the feedback target, and if the environment in which they interacted (CMC vs. FTF) made a difference in their accuracy. The study also investigated if modality affected opportunities for modified output immediately following feedback and if learners used those opportunities differently according to mode. Results demonstrated that, overall, learners did notice feedback as feedback in both modes. Contrary to expectations, there were no statistical differences between modes in feedback perception accuracy. Significant differences were found, however, in learners' opportunities for and use of feedback depending on the interaction environment and the type of error being addressed.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A