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ERIC Number: EJ1017053
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 13
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 54
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Smoking Guns or Smoke & Mirrors?: Schools and the Policing of Latino Boys
Rios, Victor M.; Galicia, Mario G.
Journal of the Association of Mexican American Educators, v7 n3 p54-66 2013
This article asserts that schools have tremendous positive power over the lives of students--the power to teach them academics; the power to socialize them to be engaged citizens; the power to transform their lives in positive ways--but schools also have negative power: the power to mark a student with a discipline record; the power to force a student out of school; and the power to catapult students into the school-to-prison pipeline. The multiple marginality that many working-class Latino students face in hyper-criminalized schools stems from a societal, racialized fear of immigrant populations, and a macro-economic transformation in which de-industrialization and post-industrialization have created the conditions for education systems to restructure themselves more punitively. Ergo, some marginalized Latino youths are no longer "learning to labor" but rather "preparing for prison" in their school settings. The multiple marginality that young working-class Latinos face today is one of a punitive society that treats and manages them, across institutional settings, as a suspect criminal class which is immersed in layers of illegality. The article examines how schools significantly facilitate the criminal-justice-system processing of many Latino boys and describes some restorative-justice approaches that could be implemented to reverse the school-to-prison pipeline.
Association of Mexican American Educators. 634 South Spring Street Suite 908, Los Angeles, CA 90014. Tel: 310-251-6306; Fax: 310-538-4976; e-mail: executivedirector@amae.org; Web site: http://www.amae.org. Journal is at
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A