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ERIC Number: EJ1016894
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Dec
Pages: 7
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 19
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1043-4046
Animal Galloping and Human Hopping: An Energetics and Biomechanics Laboratory Exercise
Lindstedt, Stan L.; Mineo, Patrick M.; Schaeffer, Paul J.
Advances in Physiology Education, v37 n4 p377-383 Dec 2013
This laboratory exercise demonstrates fundamental principles of mammalian locomotion. It provides opportunities to interrogate aspects of locomotion from biomechanics to energetics to body size scaling. It has the added benefit of having results with robust signal to noise so that students will have success even if not "meticulous" in attention to detail. First, using respirometry, students measure the energetic cost of hopping at a "preferred" hop frequency. This is followed by hopping at an imposed frequency half of the preferred. By measuring the O[subscript 2] uptake and work done with each hop, students calculate mechanical efficiency. Lessons learned from this laboratory include 1) that the metabolic cost per hop at half of the preferred frequency is nearly double the cost at the preferred frequency; 2) that when a person is forced to hop at half of their preferred frequency, the mechanical efficiency is nearly that predicted for muscle but is much higher at the preferred frequency; 3) that the preferred hop frequency is strongly body size dependent; and 4) that the hop frequency of a human is nearly identical to the galloping frequency predicted for a quadruped of our size. Together, these exercises demonstrate that humans store and recover elastic recoil potential energy when hopping but that energetic savings are highly frequency dependent. This stride frequency is dependent on body size such that frequency is likely chosen to maximize this function. Finally, by requiring students to make quantitative solutions using appropriate units and dimensions of the physical variables, these exercises sharpen analytic and quantitative skills.
American Physiological Society. 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3991. Tel: 301-634-7164; Fax: 301-634-7241; e-mail: webmaster@the-aps.org; Web site: http://advan.physiology.org/
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Journal Articles
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A