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ERIC Number: EJ1014098
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Mar
Pages: 2
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 3
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
"I'm Bored!" Spring Fever and the Gifted Child
Lindbom-Cho, Desiree R.
Parenting for High Potential, v2 n5 p8-9 Mar 2013
"I'm bored!" It is the refrain dreaded by all parents. By the time winter weather has come and gone, all kids, not just gifted ones, are ready for a change of scenery and/or a change in routine. What is an overworked parent plagued by spring fever him- or herself to do? Finding the right distraction for a gifted child can prove especially challenging given gifted individuals' propensity for overexcitabilities (Piechowski & Chucker, 2011). These overexcitabilities can manifest in a variety of ways, including restlessness, avid curiosity, overactive imaginations, and heightened emotional sensitivity, among others (Silverman, 2000). Combining a gifted child's unique overexcitabilities with boredom resulting from winter routines can confound even the most resourceful parent. Thus, finding new places to see, new things to do, and new or familiar faces with whom to play can alleviate the inevitable bout of cabin fever that sets in at this time of year for younger and older children alike. Options for finding an activity that will meet the needs of your child are numerous if one knows where to look in the community. Presented here are numerous and creative suggestions for finding activities right in one's own community. Cabin fever may plague us all at this time of year, but the refrain "I'm bored" need not add to a family's irritation. Instead, families can turn to resources online and in their local community to combat children's ennui. Bringing along a friend or two and knowing when a gifted child might just want some down time to be alone will make the outings and activities that much more fun. (Contains 1 footnote and 4 online resources.)
National Association for Gifted Children. 1331 H Street NW Suite 1001, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 202-785-4268; Fax: 202-785-4248; e-mail: nagc@nagc.org; Web site: http://www.nagc.org/php.aspx
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Parents
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A