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ERIC Number: EJ1013559
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Nov
Pages: 4
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 7
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-4391
Bring Food and Culture to the Classroom
Pazzaglia, Gina; Williams, Christine
Journal of School Health, v82 n12 p577-580 Nov 2012
To reduce the risk of intolerance to differences, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, students must be open to understanding the perspectives of different groups. Early introduction of healthy eating practices and physical activity in childhood is essential for healthy physical and emotional development. The same is true for the early introduction of diversity education, which is crucial for healthy development. Each encounter with different views and practices aids students with developing social and interaction skills. The classroom provides a perfect opportunity to introduce the issue of diversity in a safe, nonjudgmental environment. It allows for the connection of content to personal understanding and provides a forum for creative, self-expression. This can be accomplished through an active, student-centered approach that develops students' abilities to embrace diversity and understand perspectives of people who are different from them in a fun and meaningful way. Food and food behaviors are an integral part of every culture. Food provides a useful vehicle for teaching cultural diversity to school children. Making connections between personal food habits and family heritage helps students associate food and culture. Students are exposed to many contrasts and similarities when exploring culture through the use of food. This article provides a lesson plan for students in grades 9-12 that will enable them to explain the relationship between food and culture, describe personal and family food habits, identify the food habits of a person from another ethnic background, race, religion or country and how those habits influence health, and compare and contrast personal food habits with that of a person from another ethnic background, religion, or country. (Contains 3 figures.)
Wiley-Blackwell. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8598; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com; Web site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Secondary Education; Grade 9; Grade 10; Grade 11; Grade 12; High Schools
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A