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ERIC Number: EJ1007292
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Jul
Pages: 6
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0010-0277
Handing a Tool to Someone Can Take More Time than Using It
Osiurak, Francois; Roche, Kevin; Ramone, Jennifer; Chainay, Hanna
Cognition, v128 n1 p76-81 Jul 2013
Jax and Buxbaum [Jax and Buxbaum (2010). Response interference between functional and structural actions linked to the same familiar object. "Cognition, 115", 350-355] demonstrated that grasp-to-transport actions (handing an object to someone, i.e., a receiver) are initiated more quickly than grasp-to-use actions. A possible interpretation of these findings is that grasp-to-transport actions do not require activation of long-term representations. In Jax and Buxbaum's study, participants positioned their hand on the object as they would to transport/use it in a conventional way. So, movement planning was based only on egocentric relationships (individual-object) and not on allocentric relationships (object-object or object-"receiver"). It is likely that participants may not have activated long-term social representations about how to hand an object to someone in the transport task. In Experiment 1, we replicated J&B's results by asking participants to position their hand on familiar tools as they would to hand them to someone (grasp-to-transport)/use them in a non-conventional way (i.e., to hit a ball, grasp-to-use). In Experiment 2, participants had to "actually" perform the actions. We found the opposite pattern in that grasp-to-use actions were initiated more quickly than grasp-to-transport actions. These findings indicate that the modulation of allocentric constraints might induce activation of long-term representations in transport actions. This suggests that, under certain circumstances, long-term representations might be necessary not only for use actions but also for transport actions. (Contains 3 figures.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A